a little rusty

by Anne

[september 12th]

Remember one thing: we come from the southern tip of Africa, where the winter temperatures seldom dip below 8degC and where snow is the stuff of fairy tales… it is with this in mind that we head out with just a little more than trepidation. We are a little rusty; it has been some time since we have ventured far off our doorstep.

We could have headed straight up to Banff from Cranbrook, but we have this desire to peep in on the other side of the Rockies and so we set out back through Fernie towards Alberta. This is a good move, as we already know Fernie, and its stores, which makes it a little less daunting to stop for provisions, which we now have to do for ourselves; no more B&G to treat us. Okay then, it is only me that finds anything new daunting for reasons even I cannot explain to myself. It seems I have difficulty processing too much information thrown at me all at once, especially in noisy and bright conditions. It helps to talk myself through my actions, which doesn’t look good at all if I am on my own; so grateful to have Hugo at my side.

A mere one week prior to this day, Fernie was still baking under a summer sun; we return now, to a wonderland of snow-capped peaks. Excitement fills the chilly air; snow is a novelty for us!

00170017a0017b

Just around the corner, the countryside opens out into rolling agricultural plains, flanked by the Rockies to the west.
It is a good 200kms to Calgary. We settle back to enjoy the ride. I am determined not to think about negotiating the city until it is time.

And then, too soon, it is time!

Hugo is driving; that is enough for him to deal with as the traffic hurtles down at him on the wrong side of the road. His brain has yet to adjust to 60+ years of incorrect information. In South Africa, we drive on the left side of the road.
I am faced, yet again, with information hurtling down on my brain. I must remember to breathe!
We do have a GPS, but it doesn’t allow me to anticipate the next move, at least not visually, and that is when I remember google maps. YAY! I have an iPad too, with reception! Oh, how I love technology! Never before have I appreciated that little blue moving dot quite as much as right now. Once again, standstill traffic is a blessing, if one is in the correct lane! The little blue dot ensures that I can direct Hugo accordingly in very good time.

In the end, I really enjoyed the little navigation exercise.

Time to fuel up. Hugo has been watching and learning; this is not something we have to do for ourselves in South Africa. He manages like a pro. Back to the Rockies we go.

0017c

Calgary looms

0017d

breathing space enough to enjoy the art

0017f0017h0017e

0017g

everything is super large

I can hardly contain myself as we roll in closer and closer to those magnificent mountains dusted with icicles thicker than ever I have set eyes upon before. I didn’t know which way to turn as we sped past snapshots, window-framed, in every direction.

But I must concentrate. We will need to turn off at some point and everybody seems to be in a rush to get to wherever they are going.

And then it was gone; we flew under it long before our brains could catch up with the instructions. We needed a park pass, this I knew, but I hadn’t registered that we needed it as we entered the area. Easy to panic. What to do? Eventually, the little ducks all fell into their row up there in the grey matter, and I realised that we could buy our park pass at our campground; the gates we had sailed past, sans laissez-passer, were more as a convenience for those travellers that were speeding right through and out at the other end. Breathe.

It was with relief that finally, our exit came into sight. Bow Valley Parkway was a narrow winding road through luscious scenery at a very reduced speed.

We found our pre-booked campsite in good time and settled down for a good night’s rest.

Lakes are on the menu once the new day dawns.

0017i0017j0017k0017l0017m0017n0017o0017p0017q

 

Thought for the day:

“Our lives are a collection of stories – truths about who we are, what we believe, what we come from, how we struggle, and how we are strong. When we can let go of what people think, and own our story, we gain access to our worthiness – the feeling that we are enough just as we are, and that we are worthy of love and belonging. If we spend a lifetime trying to distance ourselves from the parts of our lives that don’t fit with who we think we’re supposed to be, we stand outside of our story and have to hustle for our worthiness by constantly performing, perfecting, pleasing, and proving. Our sense of worthiness lives inside of our story. It’s time to walk into our experiences and to start living and loving with our whole hearts.”
~ Brené Brown

 

Advertisements